Installing Basement Windows

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Installing Basement Windows

See Things Differently With Windows From Lowe’s Are you looking for windows for your new house or replacement windows for your existing home? You’ll find a wide selection to suit your style and needs at Lowe’s. Explore our selection of double hung windows, single hung windows, sliding windows, casement windows, accent windows, double pane windows and awning windows. If you need to stick to a tight budget, you may want to look into vinyl windows. Add skylights to let in additional daylight. Increase your privacy with glass block windows or choose from a variety of blinds and shades. Looking to revamp the outside of your home? Bay windows are a beautiful addition to the inside and outside of the house. Exterior shutters can give your home a whole new look. If you’ve got a green thumb, a garden window is a great way to display your plants and give them the sunlight they need. Egress windows are not as common and have specific size requirements, but are very important if you need to exit your home in an emergency. If part of your basement is above ground, install basement windows to bring light into the space. Make sure you have the correct window screen and window coverings to add an extra layer of protection. If you are looking for a reliable and energy efficient window, JELD-WEN windows are a good option to consider. Not sure which windows are right for you? Schedule a FREE in-home consultation or explore our Windows Buying Guide to find the right fit. After you’ve made your decision, trust Lowe’s for your window installation so you can start enjoying your view.
installing basement windows 1

Installing Basement Windows

Are you looking for windows for your new house or replacement windows for your existing home? You’ll find a wide selection to suit your style and needs at Lowe’s. Explore our selection of double hung windows, single hung windows, sliding windows, casement windows, accent windows, double pane windows and awning windows. If you need to stick to a tight budget, you may want to look into vinyl windows. Add skylights to let in additional daylight. Increase your privacy with glass block windows or choose from a variety of blinds and shades. Looking to revamp the outside of your home? Bay windows are a beautiful addition to the inside and outside of the house. Exterior shutters can give your home a whole new look. If you’ve got a green thumb, a garden window is a great way to display your plants and give them the sunlight they need. Egress windows are not as common and have specific size requirements, but are very important if you need to exit your home in an emergency. If part of your basement is above ground, install basement windows to bring light into the space. Make sure you have the correct window screen and window coverings to add an extra layer of protection. If you are looking for a reliable and energy efficient window, JELD-WEN windows are a good option to consider. Not sure which windows are right for you? Schedule a FREE in-home consultation or explore our Windows Buying Guide to find the right fit. After you’ve made your decision, trust Lowe’s for your window installation so you can start enjoying your view.
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Installing Basement Windows

Installing basement windows yourself will save you hundreds of dollars and add light and warmth to your basement and help to keep it dry. Although it is not a complicated process, to install basement windows, you will need some knowledge of masonry tools and power equipment. Consider the following steps when installing basement windows.
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Installing Basement Windows

Egress Window Choices Casement windows (windows that are hinged on one side and crank open) and side-to-side sliding windows are the best choices for egress windows. Double-hung windows (windows that slide up and down) don’t work well because they have to be almost 5 ft. tall in order to meet the minimum openable area requirements—more digging and a deeper well. Sliding windows don’t have to be as tall as a double-hung, but they do need to be wide. It takes a 48 x 48-in. sliding window to meet the minimum egress requirements. Casement windows are usually ideal because the entire window swings open. That means you can install a smaller casement window than other types. A 29-in. wide by 47-in. wide (outside frame dimensions) window will meet the requirements, and you can go even smaller if the window is equipped with special egress hinges. Modern casement windows with a single lock are also the easiest for a child to open. Check window sizes in manufacturers’ catalogs at any home center or window and door store.
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Installing Basement Windows

How-To Replacing a Basement Window Say goodbye to your old, corroded, cast-in-place basement window and hello to a new, more efficient unit Mar 04, 2015 Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Pinterest Email Basement windows are usually out of sight and out of mind, but if your old steel-framed, cast-in-place units are starting to show signs of corrosion, or the single-pane glass and lack of gasketing means leaks and drafts, then it’s time to tackle a replacement. In this video, host Justin Fink visits Fine Homebuilding veteran Mike Guertin to see his method for removing an old basement window and replacing it with a modern, energy efficient vinyl window. Read the related article:Replacing a Basement Window  Get home building tips, offers, and expert advice in your inbox Sign Up × X X Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Pinterest Email No comments yet Become a member today Get instant access to all FineHomebuilding.com content. Start Your Free Trial Subscribe to Fine Homebuilding Save up to 52% off your annual subscription. Subscribe
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Installing Basement Windows

We’ll show you all the how-to steps you need to install a basement egress window, from cutting a hole in the basement wall to framing the opening to setting the window. Doing the project yourself can save you more than $4,000. The egress window will not only allow natural sunlight to enter your dark basement, it will provide a safe escape route for you and your family during a fire or other home emergency.

An egress window in a basement dramatically brightens an otherwise dark, dingy room, but it also has a more serious purpose. It’s large enough to offer a safe exit from the basement in the event of fire or other emergency. Adding an egress window is essential any time you remodel your basement to make a new bedroom, office or other living space.
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Once the window is back in its location, place the screws where necessary. This will be determined by the model and make of the replacement basement windows you are installing. Finish the installation, place caulking around the outside of the window to make sure that it is sealed properly. This will prevent any air or water leaks.
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The egress windows we installed (two 2947 Pella ProLine casement windows for $325) are substantially larger than the minimum requirement because we wanted to bring strong natural light into this basement. But you don’t have to add ones this large. An egress window must have a clear opening of at least 5.7 sq. ft.—large enough to allow a firefighter, with equipment, to enter the home through the window. In addition, the window must be at least 20 in. wide and 24 in. high (while still meeting the 5.7-sq.-ft. requirement). Finally, the bottom of the opening can be no more than 44 in. from the floor. See “Egress Window Choices” at the end of this article for more details.
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  In this video, This Old House general contractor Tom Silva explains how to replace a basement window. Steps: 1 Remove the sash from existing basement window. 2 Use reciprocating saw to cut through the window frame. 3 Pull out the old window frame from wall opening. 4 Use hammer and cold chisel to chip away mortar from sides of opening, if necessary. 5 Slide new window into the opening. 6 Use shims to center new window in the opening. 7 Secure window by screwing up through its frame and into the mudsill. 8 From outside, apply caulk along the sides and top of the window frame. 9 Spray urethane foam under the sill to seal the bottom of the window. 10 Apply a coat of exterior-grade primer to all bare wood window parts, followed by two paint topcoats.See products and services from this episode  
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After the caulk is placed in the areas necessary, put the window back in the frame. If you need to level your replacement basement windows, you can use shims at this point.
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1 Remove the sash from existing basement window. 2 Use reciprocating saw to cut through the window frame. 3 Pull out the old window frame from wall opening. 4 Use hammer and cold chisel to chip away mortar from sides of opening, if necessary. 5 Slide new window into the opening. 6 Use shims to center new window in the opening. 7 Secure window by screwing up through its frame and into the mudsill. 8 From outside, apply caulk along the sides and top of the window frame. 9 Spray urethane foam under the sill to seal the bottom of the window. 10 Apply a coat of exterior-grade primer to all bare wood window parts, followed by two paint topcoats.See products and services from this episode

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