Singapore Botanical Garden

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Singapore Botanical Garden

The more than 150-year-old Singapore Botanic Gardens is a star visitor attraction for the sophisticated traveller and the local resident. The Gardens possess an array of botanical and horticultural attractions with a rich history and a wonderful plant collection of worldwide significance. Complementing these unique resources are sensitive developments and entertainment events providing visitors educational and recreational facilities amidst the wonders of nature. It is the most visited botanic gardens in the world and is a unique example of the informal English Landscape Movement’s style in an equatorial climate. Brief History The first botanical garden was set up by Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore and a keen naturalist, in 1822 on Government Hill at Fort Canning, mainly to introduce into cultivation economic crops. It closed in 1829 and, in 1859, at the present Tanglin site a new garden was developed by an Agri-Horticultural Society, and later handed over to the government in 1874. From an ornamental garden with roads, terraces, a band parade area and even a small zoo, it has come a long way in evolving into a leading equatorial botanic garden of 82 hectares, where major world crops, such as rubber and orchids were launched. In June 2012, Singapore ratified the World Heritage Convention and in December 2012, submitted its World Heritage Tentative List to UNESCO to indicate interest in inscribing the Singapore Botanic Gardens as a World Heritage Site. In January 2014, the official Nomination Dossier for the Gardens was submitted to UNESCO. In September 2014, a technical assessor from the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) visited the Gardens as part of the bid evaluation process. On 4 July 2015, the Gardens received inscription as a UNESCO World Heritage Site at the 39th session of the World Heritage Committee (WHC). Click here to find out more. The Marvels Within The Gardens was originally developed along a 3-core Concept. The three cores comprised Tanglin which is the heritage core retaining the old favourites and charms of the historic Gardens; Central, the tourist belt of the Gardens; and Bukit Timah, the educational and discovery zone. A fourth core, Tyersall-Gallop, was created with the opening in 2017 of the Learning Forest which is designed to integrate into the Gardens’ existing rainforest to form an enlarged forest habitat. Each Core presents an exciting array of attractions. Take your time to stroll around the Gardens and enjoy the wonderful sights, sounds and wonders the luscious greenery offers. Visit the Singapore Botanic Gardens website to find out more about the Gardens and its various attractions including the Learning Forest, National Orchid Garden and Jacob Ballas Children’s Garden. The Jacob Ballas Children’s Garden will be doubling its current size with a two-hectare extension that will include new attractions geared towards older children up to 14 years old. The new attractions include a rainforest adventure as well as marsh and farm gardens. The extension will be ready by 2018. Please click here to download and view the diversions routes leading to the current Jacob Ballas Children’s Garden during this development phase.
singapore botanical garden 1

Singapore Botanical Garden

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is protected primarily through the Planning Act of Singapore, which regulates conservation and development and requires permits to be obtained for new development or works. The Singapore Concept Plan guides strategic planning over a 40-50 year period and land use planning in Singapore is carried out by URA, the national land use planning and conservation authority. Land use, zoning and development policies for Singapore are established by a statutory Master Plan prepared under the Planning Act. The Master Plan is regularly reviewed and there are provisions for specific development control plans that provide guidance on the height and location of new developments as well as conservation principles for conserved buildings and their setting.
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Singapore Botanical Garden

Singapore Botanic Gardens Singapore’s oldest garden is a treasure trove for plant lovers, or those who simply want to have a good time outdoors. Photo by Singapore Botanic Gardens Singapore Botanic Gardens’ sprawling grounds are perfect for picnicking, jogging, or escaping the city buzz.
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Singapore Botanical Garden

The first “Botanical and Experimental Garden” in Singapore was established in 1822 on Government Hill at Fort Canning by Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of modern Singapore and a keen naturalist. The Garden’s main task was to evaluate for cultivation crops which were of potential economic importance including those yielding fruits, vegetables, spices and other raw materials. This first Garden closed in 1829.
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Singapore Botanical Garden

A testament to Singapore’s reputation as a City in a Garden, the Botanic Gardens is the country’s first UNESCO Heritage Site, joining the ranks of iconic landmarks such as Cambodia’s Angkor Wat and The Great Wall of China. Established in 1859 by the Agri-Horticultural Society, 60 acres of land were transformed from a disused plantation into the popular recreational garden you see today. As well as being a favourite recreation venue for jogging, dining or just lazing about, the sprawling grounds are also a leading centre for botanical and horticultural research. Highlights include The National Orchid Garden, which boasts the world’s largest orchid display, with over 60,000 plants and orchids. Meanwhile, the SBG Heritage Museum features interactive and multimedia exhibits and panels that detail the Gardens’ rich heritage, while the CDL Green Gallery displays botanical related exhibits. Kids will have a blast at the Jacob Ballas Children’s garden where they can play and learn all about plant life. A host of restaurants and cafes are also available to satisfy thirsty and hungry visitors after a day out in the sun. And once you’re ready to step back into the concrete jungle, the Orchard Road shopping district is mere minutes away.
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Singapore Botanical Garden

A testament to Singapore’s reputation as a City in a Garden, the Botanic Gardens is the country’s first UNESCO Heritage Site, joining the ranks of iconic landmarks such as Cambodia’s Angkor Wat and The Great Wall of China. Established in 1859 by the Agri-Horticultural Society, 60 acres of land were transformed from a disused plantation into the popular recreational garden you see today. As well as being a favourite recreation venue for jogging, dining or just lazing about, the sprawling grounds are also a leading centre for botanical and horticultural research. Highlights include The National Orchid Garden, which boasts the world’s largest orchid display, with over 60,000 plants and orchids. Meanwhile, the SBG Heritage Museum features interactive and multimedia exhibits and panels that detail the Gardens’ rich heritage, while the CDL Green Gallery displays botanical related exhibits.
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Singapore Botanical Garden

NParks is honoured to be one of the recipients of the artillery shell casings from the 21-Gun Salute for Singapore’s founding Prime Minister, the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew. The casing is on display at the Singapore Botanic Gardens Heritage Museum. Go on a Walking Trail of the Gardens There is so much to explore and see in the Singapore Botanic Gardens. We have a range of walking trail guides that you can refer to if you wish to explore the Gardens. With walking trails that range from 40 to 90 minutes in duration, there should be one that suits your needs. These trail guides (PDF files) can be accessed through your smartphone or tablet. Online Trail Guides Guided Walks Our volunteers conduct different tours each weekend (held on Saturdays, except on the 5th Saturday of the month). These walking tours are free so pick one and bring your family and friends for a fun and educational day out! Free Guided Walks
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Singapore Botanical Garden

The Singapore Botanic Gardens has a small tropical rainforest of around six hectares in size, which is older than the gardens themselves. The rainforest and its bigger cousin at the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve are located within the Singapore’s city limits. Singapore is one of the only two major cities with a tropical rainforest within its city limits, the other being Tijuca Forest in Rio de Janeiro.
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The first botanical garden was set up by Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore and a keen naturalist, in 1822 on Government Hill at Fort Canning, mainly to introduce into cultivation economic crops. It closed in 1829 and, in 1859, at the present Tanglin site a new garden was developed by an Agri-Horticultural Society, and later handed over to the government in 1874. From an ornamental garden with roads, terraces, a band parade area and even a small zoo, it has come a long way in evolving into a leading equatorial botanic garden of 82 hectares, where major world crops, such as rubber and orchids were launched.
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National Orchid Garden With around 600 species and hybrids on display, the splendour of Singapore’s national flower is a sight to behold at the National Orchid Garden. Swan Lake The Swan Lake is home to numerous species of aquatic plants and fishes, and is named as such because of a pair of beautiful mute swans from Amsterdam that glide gracefully across the lake. Singapore Botanic Gardens Heritage Museum The 240sqm Heritage Museum is located in Holttum Hall, which is next to Botany Centre in the Tanglin Core of the Gardens. Built in 1921 to serve as the Director of the Gardens’ office and laboratory, the two-storey building has been designated as an Urban Redevelopment Authority conservation building.

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